Arch Inserts for Combating Morton’s Neuroma

Morton’s Neuroma is foot condition affecting generally the nerves between the fourth and third toes. It causes the surrounding tissue to thicken, resulting in pain experienced at the ball of the feet. One can develop this problem from injury, irritation, or pressure. This normally leaves no lump, but does leave a burning pain in the affected area, as well as tingling and numbness sometimes.

When Morton’s Neuroma onsets, pain is usually felt when the person wears narrow or tight shoes. The worse this gets, the longer the pain would start to persist, sometimes in the order of weeks. Persistent foot pain must never be ignored. If you get that, your way forward is clear enough: seeing a podiatrist and getting your foot checked. The earlier this is done, the better your chances will be at preventing the need for surgical treatment.

There are some basic factors, which can contribute to Morton’s Neuroma developing in your foot. One is wearing shoes with the wrong kind of fit, such as many of the high heels that women tend to pick out these days. High impact exercise is another potential cause of this condition, and so is injury of a particular kind. Even abnormal gait stemming from flat feet or bunions can cause this effect by unduly irritating or pressurizing the tissue. There are even times when people develop Morton’s Neuroma for no apparent reason.

Podiatrists can help mitigate the effects through treatment aimed at relieving pain and healing foot tissue. Based on how severe the condition is, you can have the treatment plan vary. In mild to moderate cases, treatment usually involves application of arch padding intended for pressure relief, such as arch inserts, for example. This generally works to bring down nerve swelling as well as the compression brought about by walking alone. Custom orthotic devices providing specific arch support can be really helpful here. You would need to refrain from the activities where you submit to constant pressure near or on the affected area.

If things have gone too far south, your podiatrist may recommend surgery to fix the problem in a more definitive manner. Under this, you may have to go in for a procedure where the affected nerve is removed, or alternatively, released. It would take a thorough examination for them to figure out which approach had the best chance of solving your foot health problem.